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Monitoring Our Coffee Farms During CO-VID19

Jun 14, 2020Blog, Coffee

The world as we know it may have slowed down, and in some cases even stopped, but life on a coffee farm and the agricultural activities that we perform, continue daily.

During the week we visited our cluster of 5 farms in the Jaramillo Region, to monitor our plantations and decide on the shade control protocol that we need to implement throughout the remainder of this year.

The world as we know it may have slowed down, and in some cases even stopped, but life on a coffee farm and the agricultural activities that we perform, continue daily.

During the week we visited our cluster of 5 farms in the Jaramillo Region, to monitor our plantations and decide on the shade control protocol that we need to implement throughout the remainder of this year.

Geisha coffee tree
Image 3. Geisha coffee tree.

It is interesting to observe how the conversations and decision-making takes place among our Team, for this and other activities on our farms.

On one hand, we have the vision of our Agronomist, Jose Saraceni. He is focused mainly on the nutrition for the plants, recommending the best equipment and agronomic techniques to be used, as well as the transportation and logistics involved.

Then we have our General Manager, Andres Lopez. He is the one that decides when each activity will be implemented, when, and by who, keeping in mind all of the projects going on across all 11 farms in our network.

Our Capataz (Foreman in English) at the Jaramillo Farms, Antonio, is responsible for taking these plans, explaining them to the workers and putting them into action.

And then there is me, with the Biological point of view, responsible for providing recommendations based on a biological and environmental management point of view. This means analyzing how we implement these practices in a way that caused the least amount of damage, and actually improves, the environment in and around our farms.It is interesting to observe how the conversations and decision-making takes place among our Team, for this and other activities on our farms.

On one hand, we have the vision of our Agronomist, Jose Saraceni. He is focused mainly on the nutrition for the plants, recommending the best equipment and agronomic techniques to be used, as well as the transportation and logistics involved.

Then we have our General Manager, Andres Lopez. He is the one that decides when each activity will be implemented, when, and by who, keeping in mind all of the projects going on across all 11 farms in our network.

Our Capataz (Foreman in English) at the Jaramillo Farms, Antonio, is responsible for taking these plans, explaining them to the workers and putting them into action.

And then there is me, with the Biological point of view, responsible for providing recommendations based on a biological and environmental management point of view. This means analyzing how we implement these practices in a way that caused the least amount of damage, and actually improves, the environment in and around our farms.The world as we know it may have slowed down, and in some cases even stopped, but life on a coffee farm and the agricultural activities that we perform, continue daily.

During the week we visited our cluster of 5 farms in the Jaramillo Region, to monitor our plantations and decide on the shade control protocol that we need to implement throughout the remainder of this year.

The topography in the Jaramillo Region is very uneven and the canopy and soil conditions vary a lot throughout the farms. Therefore, the shade control activity its more complex and needs careful attention to detail.

This is the main reason why it is necessary to walk the farms regularly and identify the different scenarios we have to face. There are areas where the shade is almost 100% and we need to take different actions than in open areas where the sunlight is more available.

Young saplings
Image 5. Young saplings on a Jaramillo Farm.

The topography in the Jaramillo Region is very uneven and the canopy and soil conditions vary a lot throughout the farms. Therefore, the shade control activity its more complex and needs careful attention to detail.

This is the main reason why it is necessary to walk the farms regularly and identify the different scenarios we have to face. There are areas where the shade is almost 100% and we need to take different actions than in open areas where the sunlight is more available.

Darren Doyle

Darren Doyle

Co-Founder and President of Agronosotros

[email protected]
Toll Free USA/Canada 877-208-7988
Direct +520-226-9119 / Panama Cellular +507-6067-1091

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